Last edited by Dalmaran
Thursday, July 30, 2020 | History

5 edition of Amorphous and Microyspalline Silicon Technology 1998 found in the catalog.

Amorphous and Microyspalline Silicon Technology 1998

Symposium Held April 14-17, 1998, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. (Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings)

  • 397 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Materials Research Society .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Material Science,
  • Silicon crystals,
  • Congresses,
  • Technology & Industrial Arts,
  • Technology,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Reference,
  • Electronics - Semiconductors,
  • Amorphous semiconductors,
  • Thin film devices,
  • Chemical vapor deposition

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsRuud E. I. Schropp (Editor), Howard M. Branz (Editor), Michael Hack (Editor), Isamu Shimizu (Editor), Sigurd Wagner (Editor)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages1009
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8609013M
    ISBN 101558994130
    ISBN 109781558994133

    Crystalline silicon (c-Si) is the crystalline forms of silicon, either polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si, consisting of small crystals), or monocrystalline silicon (mono-Si, a continuous crystal).Crystalline silicon is the dominant semiconducting material used in photovoltaic technology for the production of solar cells are assembled into solar panels as part of a photovoltaic.   An approach to study the optical behavior of hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells with rough interfaces using computer modeling is presented. In this approach the descriptive haze parameters of a light scattering interface are related to the root mean square roughness of the interface. Using this approach we investigated the effect of front window contact roughness and back contact.

      Schropp and M. Zeman, Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology (Kluwer Academic, Boston/Dordrecht/London, ). Google Scholar Crossref We review the progress made by amorphous silicon solar cells, including the emerging technology of solar cells of microcrystalline silicon. The long-term trend in the efficiency of stabilized laboratory cells based on a-Si:H has been a rise of ~ % per year. The recent trend in the a-Si,Ge:H.

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si), sometimes also known as microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si), is a form of porous silicon. It is an allotropic form of silicon with paracrystalline structure—is similar to amorphous silicon (a-Si), in that it has an amorphous phase. Where they differ, however, is that nc-Si has small grains of crystalline silicon within the amorphous phase. Microcrystalline silicon Microcrystalline silicon is a two-phase material, in which crystalline regions are em-bedded in an amorphous matrix. In contrast to polycrystalline silicon, the material can be made at much lower deposition temperature. However, the materials have a significantly different structure and bandgap. In this section.


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Amorphous and Microyspalline Silicon Technology 1998 Download PDF EPUB FB2

Amorphous silicon solar cell technology has evolved considerably since the first amorphous silicon solar cells were made at RCA Laboratories in Scien­ tists working in a number of laboratories worldwide have developed improved alloys based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and microcrystalline silicon.

Amorphous silicon solar cell technology has evolved considerably since the first amorphous silicon solar cells were made at RCA Laboratories in Scien­ tists working in a number of laboratories worldwide have developed improved alloys based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and microcrystalline silicon.

Other scientists have developed new. Get this from a library. Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon Amorphous and Microyspalline Silicon Technology 1998 book symposium held April, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. [Ruud E I Schropp;]. Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology provides a comprehensive overview of materials for application in thin film solar cells.

It is the first book that compares experimental and computer-modeling methods, combining the state-of-the art in technology with the latest insights in device. Book January Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology provides a comprehensive overview of materials for application in thin film.

Hitoshi Kimura, Hirohiko Adachi, in Advances in Quantum Chemistry, Abstract. The electronic structure of microcrystalline silicon of one-dimensional (1-D), 2-D, and 3-D clusters were calculated using the Discrete-Variational (DV)-Xα Molecular-Orbital method.

The calculated results are discussed with respect to the effect of the size and the number of dimensions on the energy levels. MATERIALS RESEARCH SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS VOLUME Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Technology— Symposium held April ,San Francisco, California, U.S.A.

In fact, a “phase diagram” has been proposed (Koh et al. ) where, for a given dilution, the material changes from amorphous to microcrystalline at a certain thickness. We should mention that high-quality material showing improved order has also been obtained using deposition conditions that form silicon clusters in the plasma (Roca i.

Amorphous and microcrystalline silicon thin films are still commonly produced using the method that first resulted in hydrogen incorporation in the material (Sterling and Swann, ). Science & Technology book series (EMST, Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Technology —edited by R.

Schropp, H. Branz, S. Wagner, M. Hack. to the world's energy needs. In this book, Ruud E. Schropp and Miro Zeman provide an authoritative overview of the current status of thin film solar cells based on amorphous and microcrystalline silicon. They review the significant developments that have occurred during the evolution of the technology and also discuss the most im portant recent.

Thin‐film silicon exists in different phases, ranging from amorphous via microcrystalline to single crystalline. In contrast to the periodic lattice that characterises the crystalline form, there is only very short‐range order in amorphous silicon (a‐Si:H).

Amorphous silicon solar cell technology has evolved considerably since the first amorphous silicon solar cells were made at RCA Laboratories in Scien­ tists working in a number of laboratories worldwide have developed improved alloys based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon and microcrystalline : Ruud E.I.

Schropp, Miro Zeman. Thin-film silicon exists in different phases, ranging from amorphous via microcrystalline to single crystalline. In contrast to the periodic lattice that characterises the crystalline form, there is only very short-range order in amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The first amorphous silicon layers were deposited in an rf-driven glow discharge using.

Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology by Miro Zeman Unknown, Pages, Published No copies of this book were found in stock from online book stores and marketplaces.

Alert me when this book becomes available. Amorphous Silicon, Microcrystalline Silicon, and Thin-Film Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Article (PDF Available) in MRS Bulletin 32(03) March with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology (Electronic Materials: Science & Technology) (1st Edition) by Miro Zeman, Ruud Schropp Hardcover, Pages, Published ISBN / ISBN / Need it Fast. 2 day shipping options Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon.

Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Technology— Symposium held April ,San Francisco, California, U.S.A. EDITORS: Ruud Schropp Utrecht University Utrecht, The Netherlands Howard M.

Branz National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, U.S.A. Michael Hack dpiX,A Xerox Company Palo Alto, California, U.S.A. Isamu Shimizu. Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials and Device Technology provides a comprehensive overview of materials for application in thin film solar cells.

It is the first book that compares experimental and computer-modeling methods, combining the state of the art in technology with the latest insights in device.

Alternating cycles of thin silicon layer deposition and atomic hydrogen exposure result in silicon layers on receptive surfaces, with no net deposition on nonreceptive areas of the substrate. Selective deposition could be useful to form self-aligned contacts in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a.

17 Schropp, R.I.E. Zeman, M.: Amorphous and Microcrystalline Solar Cells: Modeling, Materials, and Device Technology Kluwer Academic Publishers Amsterdam, The Netherlands 18 Leblanc, F., Perrin, J. Schmitt, J.: Numerical modeling of the optical properties of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon-based p - i - n solar cells deposited on rough.

Strong arguments are given that suggest that the cm-1 peak in the Raman spectra of X-ray amorphous silicon is of the same origin and is hence associated with some shearing modes of Si clusters rather than a broadened density of states.

Results on the depolarisation ratio of Raman scattering in the microcrystalline and X-ray amorphous films.Real‐time ellipsometric characterization of the nucleation of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a‐Si:H) prepared by plasma‐enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on smooth, dense metal, and crystalline Si substrates is reviewed.

The experimental results for photoelectronic quality a‐Si:H from pure SiH 4 on Mo and Cr are consistent with the Volmer–Weber nucleation mode, with a.At the present time hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a mature material of the microelectronics and photovoltaic industries.

Its success is due to the compatibility with the silicon CMOS technology, the possibility of doping (n or p type), the low substrate temperatures used (≤°C) when is deposited by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) technique, and the.